I can’t remember the last time I was asked, over lunch, “Jan, what’s your relationship with objects?” But this was Didier Milleriot, the owner of the now-closed Le Magasin on Wells Street, a French tabletop boutique. So the question seemed completely natural. It sparked a lively discussion about old things, new things, things we keep, things we give away. I believe I introduced the brilliant and quite-fluent Didier to the word “waystation,” a term I used to describe my basement, the place were unwanted objects go to chill out before they are given away. The main topic of lunch was Didier’s new Web site, ShopAndSource. On it, Didier, who, for personal reasons, moved back to France a few months ago, posts his daily finds—antiques, vintage pieces, and new decorative accessories he locates in the markets of France. All are for sale. Didier can also find a particular object for you (furniture, linens, an Art Déco vase). And should you find yourself traveling to Paris and/or Provence, he’ll shop the markets with you, translating and handling shipping arrangements. I love that he is completely upfront about his fees, which are posted on his site: about $128 to initiate a search, plus a 10 percent markup (search fee waived for big purchases). A day of shopping with the delightful Didier is about $900. Didier has already helped the owners of The Golden Triangle procure merchandise; see the results here. Judging from my interest in Didier’s finds, I’d say my relationship with objects is quite solid, thank you.

—JAN PARR

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Object Lesson

I can’t remember the last time I was asked, over lunch, “Jan, what’s your relationship with objects?” But this was Didier Milleriot, the owner of the now-closed Le Magasin on Wells Street, a French tabletop boutique. So the question seemed completely natural. It sparked a lively discussion about old things, new things, things we keep, things we give away. I believe I introduced the brilliant and quite-fluent Didier to the word “waystation,” a term I used to describe my basement, the place were unwanted objects go to chill out before they are given away. The main topic of lunch was Didier’s new Web site, ShopAndSource. On it, Didier, who, for personal reasons, moved back to France a few months ago, posts his daily finds—antiques, vintage pieces, and new decorative accessories he locates in the markets of France. All are for sale. Didier can also find a particular object for you (furniture, linens, an Art Déco vase). And should you find yourself traveling to Paris and/or Provence, he’ll shop the markets with you, translating and handling shipping arrangements. I love that he is completely upfront about his fees, which are posted on his site: about $128 to initiate a search, plus a 10 percent markup (search fee waived for big purchases). A day of shopping with the delightful Didier is about $900. Didier has already helped the owners of The Golden Triangle procure merchandise; see the results here. Judging from my interest in Didier’s finds, I’d say my relationship with objects is quite solid, thank you.

I can’t remember the last time I was asked, over lunch, “Jan, what’s your relationship with objects?” But this was Didier Milleriot, the owner of the now-closed Le Magasin on Wells Street, a French tabletop boutique. So the question seemed completely natural. It sparked a lively discussion about old things, new things, things we keep, things we give away. I believe I introduced the brilliant and quite-fluent Didier to the word “waystation,” a term I used to describe my basement, the place were unwanted objects go to chill out before they are given away. The main topic of lunch was Didier’s new Web site, ShopAndSource. On it, Didier, who, for personal reasons, moved back to France a few months ago, posts his daily finds—antiques, vintage pieces, and new decorative accessories he locates in the markets of France. All are for sale. Didier can also find a particular object for you (furniture, linens, an Art Déco vase). And should you find yourself traveling to Paris and/or Provence, he’ll shop the markets with you, translating and handling shipping arrangements. I love that he is completely upfront about his fees, which are posted on his site: about $128 to initiate a search, plus a 10 percent markup (search fee waived for big purchases). A day of shopping with the delightful Didier is about $900. Didier has already helped the owners of The Golden Triangle procure merchandise; see the results here. Judging from my interest in Didier’s finds, I’d say my relationship with objects is quite solid, thank you.

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