Finish this Sentence: Paul Schulman

We love to hear the opinions of designers, architects, and all-around aesthetes about any number of lifestyle subjects…

We love to hear the opinions of designers, architects, and all-around aesthetes about any number of lifestyle subjects. And since we are generally nosy people, we’ve started a new column. “Finish this Sentence” is our chance to get to know the tastemakers in our community. We start with interior designer and furniture maker Paul Schulman. Paul, please finish these questions… (Our query is in boldface type).

  1. In 2012 I hope to see less pointless detailing and more editing. Lately, I’ve seen a number of spaces—some commercial, some residential— that suffer from too many un-cohesive accents. This is not to say I don’t want to see detailing. I do. Details define the feel of a space in many ways, but the strategy and the editing is so crucial to success. 
  2. If I could live in any movie or TV setting it would be Lionel Dobie’s (played by Nick Nolte) loft in New York Stories. He lives in this amazing raw warehouse in Soho that reminds me of some spaces I was more familiar with in college—only bigger and more romantic.
  3. I eat like an absolute pig when I go to Chilam Balam. I am not much of a Mexican food fan typically, but, this chef knows something. The space, which is a walk-up in Lake View, feels more like a college grotto than a high end eatery, but the food is amazing!
  4. The most aesthetically pleasing place I’ve visited recently was this Bucktown restaurant called Duchamp. It’s not often when a small restaurant gets the design as right as it does with the food. They did. The materials, the colors, the lighting—they nailed it. The food is amazing too; get the brussels sprouts. 
  5. The best advice I’ve heard recently is: “It’s the deviated form that draws attention and produces something memorable.” This from Nancy Harris Rouemy, former New York Times Magazine art director and current owner of Go For it Design, Ltd. in reference to typography (see her work in the photo above). But this principle applies to interior design and architecture as well.

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