Supersize your kitchen island

FANTASY ISLANDS: If the kitchen is the center of the home, the island is the epicenter. We love when designers supersize it

A drywalled structural column anchors the eight-foot-long L-shaped island that Bill Rodon-Hornof of 2RZ Architecture created in this Lincoln Park condo.
1. A drywalled structural column anchors the eight-foot-long L-shaped island that Bill Rodon-Hornof of
2RZ Architecture
created in this Lincoln Park condo. The quartz-topped longer portion, with cooktop, is a food-prep area; the lower glass-topped laminate table is a place to have a cup of coffee and read the paper.

 

A drywalled structural column anchors the eight-foot-long L-shaped island that Bill Rodon-Hornof of 2RZ Architecture created in this Lincoln Park condo.
2. Drury Design’s Tina Muller outfitted the kitchen of this vacation home in rural Illinois with a 15-foot island
that includes two warming drawers, a sink, a dishwasher, and many storage options; the polished granite surface extends into a seating area for up to six people. The light fixtures look like clusters of milk bottles, a chic reference to the farmland setting.

 

This Beverly kitchen designed by Barbara Ince and Sarah Davis of Susan Fredman Design Group has three quartzite-topped islands lined up below ceiling cutouts that mimic their shape and size
3. This Beverly kitchen designed by Barbara Ince and Sarah Davis of Susan Fredman Design Group has three quartzite-topped islands lined up below ceiling cutouts that mimic their shape and size. The far island is a high-top table that seats six; the center structure houses a sink and a dishwasher; the one in the foreground is a baking station. Having three islands instead of one big one allows for more flexible traffic flow in the large room.

 

The 21-foot-long quartzite-topped walnut mega-island they delivered has a prep sink, two trash centers, pull-out refrigeration, and capacious storage, as well as a seating area.
4. The owner of this Lake View house told Brian Goldberg of LG Development Group and Fred Wilson of Morgante-Wilson Architects that she wanted a place where her children could do homework, help her cook, and work on projects. The 21-foot-long quartzite-topped walnut mega-island they delivered has a prep sink, two trash centers, pull-out refrigeration, and capacious storage, as well as a seating area.

 

Horizontal lines created by aluminum inlays in the charcoal-stained rift-cut oak cabinetry accentuate the generous length (15 feet) of the island. Its polished white quartz countertop echoes the reflective glass-front cupboards and tile over the cooktop.
5. Shawna Dillon of Snaidero, along with architect Pam Lamaster-Millett of Searl Lamaster Howe, oversaw the design of this kitchen in a Streeterville condo. Horizontal lines created by aluminum inlays in the charcoal-stained rift-cut oak cabinetry accentuate the generous length (15 feet) of the island. Its polished white quartz countertop echoes the reflective glass-front cupboards and tile over the cooktop.

 

Photography: (2) Eric Hausman; (3) Nick Novelli, Novelli Photodesign; (4) Tony Soluri Photography

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