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Hellman-Chang Brings Its Timeless Designs to Merchandise Mart

Plus, two exhibitions from exotic locales, the summer’s best street market, and more home and design news this week

The Parker Dining Table from Hellman-Chang, where Eric Chang (right) is a partner.   Photos: Courtesy of Hellman-Chang

This Week’s Top Story

The timeless handcrafted furniture from Brooklyn-based Hellman-Chang has found a new home among other artisan designers at the Bright Group Showroom (6-166 Merchandise Mart, thebrightgroup.com). Just released as part of the brand’s 2017 line are the Natalia Sideboard with brass cladding and Carrera marble top; the asymmetrical James Dining Table, whose solid-wood legs are wrapped in brass; and the super-skinny surfboard-shaped Parker Dining Table, perfect for condo living.

Partner Eric Chang says he began woodworking as a fun weekend undertaking. “My parents would pull the cars out of the garage during the summers in high school, and we would go in there and test how well we learned woodworking from the books we borrowed from the library,” he says. The expensive hobby morphed into a full-fledged business 10 years ago, with lots of awards to follow.

Chang’s signature style—three-piece suits, brightly-hued blazers, funky pocket squares—has been photographed by Annie Liebovitz, and that originality shines through in his iconic pieces, like the Z Dining Table, a dynamic centerpiece that’s offered with four top options, three base options, or as an extension table. Elegance and craftsmanship are paramount, he says: “We intend to prove to the world that the best-designed and best-made furniture can come from America.”

Interior Intel

The Golden Triangle (330 N. Clark St., goldentriangle.biz) just received a new shipment of Hungarian furnishings from the 1920s to the 1970s. Douglas Van Tress’s 18,000-square-foot River North showroom is exhibiting more than 50 pieces from his December 2016 buying trip to Budapest. Think: Art Deco, Czech glass, Brutalist oddities. Our favorite is the Jindrich Halabala Chairs, antique seats upcycled with cream linen upholstery and black piping—a stunning blend of ancient and modern.

Love that exotic antique look? A new exhibition of Toyoharu Kii’s mosaic works has just gone on display at Pagoda Red (400 N. Morgan St., pagodared.com). Through July 28, peek into the world of Kii and his monochromatic pieces laid with Italian marble and glass—they take traditional Japanese screen paintings into the 21st century.

French modern furniture company Ligne Roset just re-opened its showroom (440 N. Wells St., ligne-roset.com). The 6,000-square-foot space is now owned by Venezuela native Jose Rodriguez, who rose from sales associate in Miami to owner of his own outpost in Atlanta. The shop here will be stocked with a mix of classic and new pieces from the family-run business, including lighting, rugs, textiles, and whimsical furniture.

Sale

Bedside Manor (shopbedside.com) is holding its annual furniture and accessory sale at all four Chicago stores through the end of June. Some of the featured brands include Kindel Furniture, Bungalow 5, and Redford House—all going for 20 to 40 percent off.

Events

Randolph Street Market’s second market of the summer is this weekend (1340 W. Washington Blvd., randolphstreetmarket.com). Purchase tickets for the event Saturday or Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., for the Fourth of July–themed “Red, White, and Cool” market in the West Loop/Fulton Market District. At this “Barney’s of vintage,” browse antiques, jewelry, home décor, and gifts from more than 300 vendors. Once you’re done shopping, stick around to lounge in the Shade Shack, dine on gourmet bites, or dance to the sounds of a live DJ (disco will be spinning). Kids (and pets) are welcome, too: every child is offered a map and activity sheet at the gate for some serious treasure hunting.

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