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Longman & Eagle’s Inn Style

Longman & Eagle’s guest rooms have the rustic-hip thing down

Longman & Eagle Guest Room
Lots of wood equals lots of warmth. Four of the six guest rooms have at least one paneled wall, some made with planks from the building’s original floors (pictured above) and ceiling beams (pictured below). More photos below
 

With deer antlers running amuck in both restaurant and home design schemes of late, it’s refreshing to see a lodge aesthetic executed with a light, sophisticated hand, as it is at Longman & Eagle, the new bar-restaurant with a six-room inn upstairs, in Logan Square.

What makes Longman & Eagle’s sensibility so different? Well, for one thing, instead of channeling Aspen, as many buck-filled hot spots on both coasts have been doing for the past few years, the four partners behind the project localized their concept, referencing inns of this kind (offering booze, food, and shelter) that once dotted the neighborhoods of our city.

“We wanted to take an old idea that had disappeared here and bring it back in a modern way,” says project co-designer Cody Hudson, who collaborated with Robert McAdams of Mode Carpentry (the firm worked on The Publican, Nightwood, Big Star, and other restaurants). While the team did allow for a single wolf pelt in the establishment—in the upstairs hallway—for the most part the goal was a more timeless look.

Making the Chicago connection even deeper, they also tapped local artists and businesses—Sprout Home, Post27, and Unison—to help them with decor. The result is a cozy, cool, and just-luxe-enough respite for the weary urban traveler—and an excellent source of inspiration for the design lover. 2657 N. Kedzie Ave., 773-276-7110, longmanandeagle.com

 


The built-ins are all by Mode Carpentry, chairs were designed by Mode’s John Martin, and the door numbers were painted by artist Ryan Duggan.

 


The bathrooms (above and below) have modern sinks and showers; two have freestanding tubs.

 


Vintage mirrors are from Jan’s Antiques; terrariums from Sprout Home.

 

Photography: Clayton Hauck

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