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Bring It Home

A microtonal palette and clean-lined furnishings keep the mood light, the look sophisticated.

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PUT IT IN NEUTRAL  Grays, creams, taupes, beiges, and other gentle neutrals create a harmonious feeling in a bedroom. Upholstered Wyatt bed, $1,299, at Room & Board; Double Round lamp, $583, at Lightology; five-by-eight-foot Strand rug, $799, at Room & Board, City Slicker wood composite cube table with lacquer finish, $179, at CB2.

 

THE RIGHT WHITE There’s white, and then there are all those other whites, each ever so slightly different from the rest. For designer Louise Witkin, who has created several homes with a white palette, coming up with the right shade is a constant struggle. For the interior walls of the New Buffalo house, Witkin sought a white that was not cold, so she stayed away from blue undertones. “I added yellow and black until I got what I wanted,” she says. The trim of the windows, in contrast, is a brighter, semigloss white. “I wanted to articulate them in some way and have them stand out,” she says.

Not up for custom mixing? We asked a couple of interior designers for their favorite whites:

  • Designer Michael Abrams likes Benjamin Moore’s semigloss Linen White on trim and millwork; he also uses it in a flat finish for ceilings. “It is a classic, creamy soft white that is warm and complements a multitude of wall colors and coverings,” he says. From Benjamin Moore’s Affinity Collection he likes Etiquette (“a fresh version of white if you want a warm gray undertone”) and Wish, “just the right trim contrast for countless grays.”
  • Designer Tom Stringer’s favorite white for trim and ceilings is Pratt & Lambert Silver Lining. “It’s beautiful with neutral-toned walls,” he says. He’s also a fan of Benjamin Moore’s Linen White for trim, with its “very subtle peachy-pink undertones.” For a bold, modern white where trim and walls are the same tone, he likes Benjamin Moore’s Decorator’s White.

 

Clockwise from top: Lyra 120 linear suspension lighting used as a modern chandelier, $2,063, at Lightology; Lyptus Aztec easel, $110, at Pearl Art & Craft Supply; Troy chaise, $899, at Crate & Barrel; Alex drawers, $119, at Ikea.

 

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Photography: Nathan Kirkman
Styling: Diane Ewing

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