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Where Does it All Go?

We asked some Chicago-area residents to keep track of their expenditures for a week. Inside their catalogs of the necessary, the discretionary, and the mundane: revelations
by Shane Tritsch


Except for the lucky few who are so rich it doesn’t matter, most people must maintain a daily mental dialogue between necessity and desire, weighing what they can afford and what they can’t. But how many people know where all their money really goes? Judging from reports about Americans’ negative savings rate, perhaps not enough of them. “I think people in general don’t have a clear sense of what’s going out the door,” says Greg Zibricky, president of Provider Group, a financial advisory service in southwest suburban Frankfort. “If I were to walk into a Starbucks and there were 100 people in line, I bet more than half of those folks wouldn’t have a real good feel for what they’re spending. The want versus the need is what gets in the way of them having a handle on it.”

To learn more about how people manage their money, we enlisted a range of Chicagoans (whose names we’ve changed) to keep a tally of their expenditures for seven straight days in January. They also told us about their income, savings, and regular monthly expenses. Whether young or old, single or married, urban or suburban, modest of means or affluent, most found the exercise illuminating, even eye-opening. And while some were simply resigned to their current spending patterns—“It’s just how it is,” said a teacher and mother of three—others resolved to pay closer attention to how they allocate their precious resources.

illustration of money-related objects

THE RECOVERING SPENDTHRIFT


FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT

Emily, 27, project manager, promotions company
Residence: apartment in Bucktown
Salary: $50,000
Portfolio: 401(k) plan: $25,000

Emily, a project manager for a promotions company, referees a near-daily cage match between her inner penny pincher and binge spender. She keeps her housing costs low by splitting rent, utilities, and groceries with her live-in boyfriend. And to save money, lately she hasn’t been eating out, even though visits to restaurants are “usually a daily occurrence,” she says. (During the week covered here, she took leftovers to work every day for lunch.) Emily balances her checkbook every other day, obsessively tracking outlays to the penny. But, she says, “I don’t think I’m careful about what I spend—I buy what I want to buy.” That may explain why her credit card debt ballooned to $7,000 last year; she has since whittled that by half. On the other side of the ledger, she salts away more than $250 a month in a savings account—though her balance will take a hit when she travels to Israel this spring—and she contributes the same amount to a 401(k) plan. Bottom line: “I’m trying to curb my spending, but not very successfully.”

MONTHLY EXPENSES

Rent
$625
Utilities (electricity and gas)
$135
TV and Internet
$64
Cell phone
$55
Health insurance
$50
Credit card debt
$300
Student loans
$254
Auto (insurance, fuel, maintenance)
$240
Groceries and household items
$100
TOTAL
$1,823
THE WEEK AT A GLANCE
SUNDAY  

Best Buy Chris Daughtry CD (gift)

$15.21
MONDAY  

Kohl’s hat and slippers (gift)

$38.36

Kmart tape, air freshener, bleach

$6.26
TUESDAY  

Chase credit card bill

$244.42

Bank of America credit card debt payment

$1,000.00

Federal Student Aid payment of school loans

$254.08

Progressive Casualty Insurance Co. car insurance premium

$77.85

Illinois Bone and Joint Institute physical therapy

$207.10

Peoples Energy bill payment

$61.48

College alma mater donation

$20.00

World Wildlife Fund donation

$20.00
WEDNESDAY  

CVS medicine, toiletries

$24.54
THURSDAY  

Jo Ann Fabrics & Crafts scrapbook supplies

$21.40

Wal-Mart Puffs, dishwashing liquid, miscellaneous items

$14.89

Jo Ann Fabrics & Crafts scrapbook supplies

$2.18

Windy City Scrapbooking adhesives for scrapbooking

$5.98

Lazo’s Tacos dinner with friend (Thursday ritual)

$24.53
FRIDAY  

Amoco week’s worth of gas

$24.60

Dominick’s groceries for extra dinner guest

$14.68
SATURDAY  

No expenses

 
TOTAL SPENDING FOR WEEK
$2,077.56
RECENT SPLURGE
NEXT SPLURGE
$1,500 for Christmas presents, including Sony PSP ($300) for boyfriend
$3,500 for three-week spring trip to Israel

illustration of various foods

THE URBAN FAMILY: SHE SAYS HE SPENDS


FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT

Chris, 42, chief financial officer
Dana, 42, high-school teacher
Dependents: three children, all younger than ten
Residence: house in Edgebrook
Salaries: His: $120,000; Hers: $102,000
Other income: $4,000 in dividends
Total income: $226,000
Portfolio: The couple set aside about $1,750 a month for saving and investing.

For Dana, who teaches high school in the northwest suburbs, the mere act of tracking her expenditures concentrated the mind. “It was good for me to see where the money was going,” she says.

“It made me spend less or think twice before spending.” Despite her newfound discipline, she says, “when I e-mailed my husband to tell him the total, he was shocked: ‘Where did it all go?’ And he’s a financial guy.” For this Edgewater couple, the distinction between necessity and profligacy is in the eye of the beholder. “My husband says I buy frivolous stuff,” she says. “I think he spends excessively.” Exhibit A: her scrapbooking hobby—which she deems “important” and he calls “silly.” Meanwhile, she points to his alleged excesses. “He took my daughter to Costco and bought her two bathing suits instead of one,” she complains. “And the case of wine he bought—I don’t know that we needed that much, even if it was a great deal.” By contrast, she points to her own spending vigilance—she bought a memory card on e-Bay because it was much cheaper than at Costco, and she always waits for sales to buy goods such as bedding. Will she apply any new lessons to future savings? “No, because I don’t think I spent that badly,” she says. Bottom line: “We could always save more, but with three young children, how can you?”

MONTHLY EXPENSES

Housing (mortgage, taxes, insurance)
$2,342
Utilities (gas, electricity, water)
$350
Transportation (car payments, gas, auto insurance, I-PASS)
$1,505
Health, life, dental insurance
$169
Cable TV
$60
Telecommunications (land line, cell phones, internet)
$150
Nanny
$2,000
Groceries
$700
TOTAL
$7,276

THE WEEK AT A GLANCE (his expenses in blue)
SUNDAY  

Church donation

$22.00

Children’s Memorial Hospital parking

$4.00

McDonald’s lunch

$5.83

Windy City Scrapbook hobby supplies

$20.08

Happy Foods groceries

$3.73
MONDAY  

Costco groceries

$34.34

Elementary school child’s field trip

$3.20

Dominick’s groceries

$14.48

Starbucks coffee

$3.73

Paypal memory card for camera, scrapbook paper

$25.86

Archivers scrapbooking materials

$25.00

Burger King lunch for kids

$9.22
TUESDAY  

Corner Bakery birthday lunch for friend

$60.00

Dunkin’ Donuts treats for students

$23.11

School department party

$15.00

Les-on Pharmacy medicine

$3.00

Michael’s scrapbooking tape

$3.90
WEDNESDAY  

Housekeeper cleaning services

$60.00

AT&T phone and Internet service

$85.00

Visa monthly bill

$27.00

Dentist copay for six-month checkups

$30.00

Citgo gas for his car

$33.00

2001 (filling station) gas for her car

$39.00

Jewel teaching materials for Cub Scouts meeting

$54.62
THURSDAY  

Costco pictures, Pull-ups, People

$74.33

Michael’s scrapbooking tape

$3.90
FRIDAY  

Northwestern Memorial Hospital parking

$9.00

Moher’s dinner

$70.00

Nanny week’s pay

$500.00

Various places coffee, treats, miscellaneous

$13.00
SATURDAY  

Public library DVD

$1.00

Graziano’s dinner

$90.00

Wine Discount Store case of wine

$165.74

Costco groceries and goods

$168.06

Lee’s Auto Parts headlight

$33.69

Michael’s scrapbooking materials

$23.21

Scrapbook Source

$17.04

Windy City Scrapbooking hobby materials

$25.06
TOTAL SPENDING FOR WEEK
$1,799.13
RECENT SPLURGE
NEXT SPLURGE
$26,000 on a new car
Spring family vacation; destination and cost unknown

illustration of pizza, movie tickets, take-out box

THE SUBURBAN FAMILY: SWEATING THE SMALL STUFF


FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT

George, 46, insurance wholesaler
Amanda, 45, manager, state government
Residence: house in Glenview
Dependents: two sons, ages 10 and 14

Salaries: Hers: $84,000; His: $60,000
Total income: $144,000
Portfolio: 401(K) plan: $100,000

George and Amanda, the parents of two boys, figure they’re managing their finances well when it comes to the big-ticket stuff. Their cars are paid for. Their house payments are well within reach of their combined salaries. And they take reasonably priced family vacations. Meanwhile, Amanda is able to divvy up $926 a month between a 401(k) plan and college savings plans for the two boys. So what’s bothering George? It’s that small leak in his wallet, the daily drip of expenditures for things like soda pop or snacks at convenience stores or family dinners at restaurants. “You don’t think you’re spending that much that often,” he says. “But when you write it all out, it’s like, wow, that’s quite an extensive list.” Among the inconvenient truths: “We order food out more than we thought, and spend more than we thought we did,” he says. Even when he and his wife think they’re saving, he realizes, they’re still spending. “My wife tells me she saved $100 on this dress, but it still looks to me like she spent $100,” he says. “It’s all in how you look at it.” Still, George is the first to admit that he is the chief offender. On a recent Costco visit, he strayed off budget, as he often does, buying three impulse items for himself, including a shirt for the family vacation this spring. “I’m pretty undisciplined about spending on little things and everyday stuff,” he says. “My wife is more organized. I don’t always stick to the parameters we’ve outlined.” With college looming one day for his sons, George knows he can do better. “This has given us impetus to be wiser in our spending,” he says. “You see where some wasted money could be saved.”

MONTHLY EXPENSES

Housing (mortgage, real-estate taxes, insurance)
$1,780
Utilities (gas, electricity, water)
$200
Transportation (fuel and insurance on two cars)
$235
Health and life insurance
$286
TV and Internet
$146
Telephones (land line and two mobile phones)
$265
Cleaning service
$65
Gym membership
$80
Groceries
$600
TOTAL
$3,657
THE WEEK AT A GLANCE (his expenses in blue)
SUNDAY  

Church donation

$5.00

Borders books

$35.62

White Hen newspapers, coffee

$5.11

Costco groceries, merchandise

$71.71
MONDAY  

Productive Strategies professional training

$1,000.00

Citgo bag of M&Ms

$1.35

Citgo gas (his car)

$34.06

Burger King lunch with son

$8.81
TUESDAY  

AIG life insurance premium

$103.50

AT&T cell phone bill

$40.58

JCPenney bill payment

$60.00

Wal-Mart bill payment

$80.00

ComEd electric bill payment

$60.27

ComEd late electric bill payment

$59.44

Wal-Mart bill payment

$80.00

Macy’s bill payment

$100.00

Red Star lunch of Chinese food

$7.25
WEDNESDAY  

Chicago street meter parking

$7.50

Jewel groceries

$17.30

Mobil gas (her car)

$32.85

McDonald’s breakfast

$3.12

McDonald’s breakfast for kids

$3.25

Restaurant lunch

$3.56

Portillo’s family dinner

$25.00
THURSDAY  

McDonald’s breakfast

$4.25

Subway lunch

$5.71

Wal-Mart household items

$56.10
FRIDAY  

Hair salon haircut

$35.00

Jewel bag of Fritos

$2.14

Younger son money for movie

$8.00

Older son money for movie, snacks

$21.50

Snack counter coffee

$1.52

Dentist teeth cleaning

$100.00

Northfield Township vehicle stickers

$160.00

Nicor gas bill payment

$95.67

Jewel carton of Coke

$4.58

Pappi’s pizza carryout

$34.60
SATURDAY  

Housekeeper cleaning services

$65.00

Costco groceries

$67.22

Jewel groceries

$42.22

Bennigan’s family dinner

$57.00
TOTAL SPENDING FOR WEEK
$2,605.79
RECENT SPLURGE
NEXT SPLURGE
$800 for party to celebrate son’s graduation from junior high school
$5,000 for family’s spring vacation to the Southwest

illustration of laptop computer, coffee cups

THE RAINMAKER


FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT

Tom, 48, partner in a small Chicago law firm
Nancy, Tom’s wife, does not work outside home
Dependents: son in college, daughter in high school
Residence: Northbrook; second home in California
Salary: $300,000
Bonus: $200,000
Dividends: $7,500
Total income: $500,000-plus
Portfolio: Savings: $22,000; Investments: $550,000; Equity in law firm: $1.3 million

Every December, Tom, a partner at a downtown law firm, withdraws about $300 in $5 bills, money he’ll hand out in the coming weeks to “street people,” as he calls them. “I give [the bills] out till they’re gone, one at a time,” he says. His generosity is laudable, but after considering the magnitude of his overall spending, he has gained new perspective. “The numbers are huge,” he says of his outlays. “It’s embarrassing to see. It makes the need for doing more charitably seem greater.” As it is, his annual income in excess of half a million dollars allows him to comfortably foot some rather large expenses—maintaining two houses, operating four cars, funding his son’s college education—while still salting away $50,000 a year in retirement contributions. Tom describes himself as “habituated” to his level of spending and “not terribly disciplined.” Among the other members of his family—his wife, son, and a daughter—only one is disciplined, he says without elaborating, while one is not and one is “in-between.” Fortunately, he says, his “money coming in exceeds the outflow.” Still, with one child in college and another starting next year, “there are limits” to the lifestyle even his lofty pay can fund. “But in four years, college is done,” he says. “Then it’s easy.” Make that easy street. Tom’s idea of it: to own his houses outright and have retirement in-come of about $120,000 a year after taxes. Estimated time of arrival? About 15 years.

MONTHLY EXPENSES

Monthly expenses First home (mortgage, taxes, insurance)

$4,762
Second home (mortgage, taxes)
$1,314
Utilities (gas, electricity, water)
$370
Health, life, and disability insurance
$1,758
Land line and mobile phones
$355
Cable TV with Internet
$130
Train fare
$75
Fuel and insurance on four cars
$616
College (son’s tuition, room, board, and living expenses)
$3,750
Small student loan
$118
Groceries
$750
Health club membership
$180
TOTAL
$14,178
THE WEEK AT A GLANCE
SUNDAY  

Starbucks tall coffee

$1.81

Evanston Northwestern Healthcare physician copay

$10.21

Illinois Department of Revenue estimated quarterly income tax

$2,250.00

U.S. Treasury estimated quarterly income tax

$25,000.00

Chase credit card payment

$16,027.00

Construction contractor bathroom remodeling

$9,240.55

Pike fraternity son's dues

$410.00

Zengeler Cleaners dry cleaning

$51.15

Interior designer bathroom remodeling

$187.50

Comcast TV and Internet

$153.79

Village of Northbrook water bill

$75.60

Colonial Dental checkup

$390.00

Son in college bank transfer for rent, expenses

$1,000.00
MONDAY  

Starbucks apple cider, venti coffee

$4.25

Garage parking

$5.00
TUESDAY  

Garage parking

$1.00

Starbucks venti coffee, apple cider

$4.25

Street people donations

$10.00
WEDNESDAY  

Garage parking

$12.00

Starbucks venti coffee, apple cider

$4.25

Street people donations

$15.00
THURSDAY  

Shell doughnut for daughter

$1.00

Garage parking

$12.00

Starbucks venti coffee, cider, and cookie

$6.28

Street person donation

$5.00

Red Envelope Valentine's Day gift

$51.50

CVS medicine

$46.31

P.F. Chang's dinner

$56.09
FRIDAY  

Panera roll for daughter

$0.90

Starbucks chai tea, roll for daughter

$4.41

McDonald's double cheeseburger

$2.08

Highway rest stop snacks (en route to Mich.)

$3.53

Skyway, Indiana Toll Road tolls

$3.30

Pilot filling station gas

$28.49

Cottage Inn pizza dinner with children

$67.09

Circle K Diet Coke, Raisinets

$2.88
SATURDAY  

Angelo's breakfast with kids, two friends

$67.09

Urban Outfitters clothes for daughter, gifts

$86.87

Church donation

$20.00

Bivouac clothes for son

$104.94

Steve and Barry's shirt for daughter

$12.69

Zingerman's bakery loaf of raisin bread

$5.95

Damon's restaurant dinner with kids

$46.12

Courtyard Inn payment for two nights' lodging

$222.22
TOTAL SPENDING FOR WEEK
$55,710.10
RECENT SPLURGE
NEXT SPLURGE

$100,000 for renovation of three bathrooms

$4,000 for Macintosh laptop for son and daughter

illustration with wine bottles, coctail glass

THE AFFLUENT COUPON CLIPPER


FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT

Kate, 38, account director for a large advertising and
marketing agency
Residence: condo in Lincoln Square
Salary: $165,000

Portfolio: Savings: $40,000; 401(k) plan: $200,000

Keeping a lid on spending is usually not a problem for Kate, who describes her approach as “pretty conservative.” She drove a stripped-down used Honda Civic for years when she could have afforded a fancier car. And for the past three years she has endured the hideous living room furniture that survived her divorce—but not because she couldn’t afford to replace it. “The furniture was a compromise with my husband, and I hated it,” she says. “But I could not justify getting rid of it, because it was expensive.” If loosening the purse strings does not come easy to her, perhaps that’s because she absorbed the financial lessons imparted by her father, a former economics teacher. Today she stretches her income by paying for health care with pretax dollars in a flexible spending account. She will never buy a car new—her current ride is a fully loaded Volvo she got with 30,000 miles on it, saving about $12,000 over the same model new. And she clips coupons to save about $60 a month on groceries. Combine her prudent spending with a healthy income, and a pristine financial profile emerges. She has banked enough cash to live on comfortably for six months if need be, and she contributes the maximum to her 401(k) plan each year (meaning $15,500 in 2007). Still, hers is hardly the grim march of the miserly. At 38, she’s considering becoming a single mom—and buying a motorcycle. As for that unsightly living room furniture, she finally had an epiphany: “You get rid of it because you don’t want it,” she says. Result: A living room makeover is under way.

MONTHLY EXPENSES

Housing (mortgage, assessments, property taxes, insurance)
$2,410
Utilities (gas and electricity)
$70
Car (financing, insurance, gas)
$680
Phone and Internet service
$59
Cell phone paid by employer  
Health insurance
$65
Cleaning service (once a month)
$80
Groceries
$250
Pet care (food and medicine for 11-year-old Yorkie)
$85
Health club
$75
Personal trainer
$540
TOTAL
$4,314
THE WEEK AT A GLANCE
SUNDAY  

Cardinal Liquors Effen Black Cherry vodka (gift for a party)

$35.00
MONDAY  

White Hen coffee

$1.78

Potbelly lunch

$6.25

ComEd electric bill

$52.00

Comcast Cable TV bill

$69.00
TUESDAY  

Howard Orloff 45,000-mile maintenance (with 10-percent-off coupon)

$380.00

Nail salon polish change

$12.00

Bar Louie dinner, drinks with friend

$43.00
WEDNESDAY  

Signature Room drinks, appetizers

$129.00

Gold Coast deli lunch

$11.00

Condo association monthly assessment

$240.00
THURSDAY  

Gilda's Club donation

$15.00

Landmark drinks

$37.00

Luxbar drinks

$11.00

Taxi ride home

$26.00
FRIDAY  

Contractor - rehab on doors and moldings

$980.00

Decorative painter - for work on living room

$550.00

Bloomingdale's leather gloves (on sale)

$82.00
SATURDAY  

Home Depot paint supplies

$72.00

Hardware store paint supplies

$83.00

Simon's Shine Shop car wash and wax

$69.99
TOTAL SPENDING FOR WEEK
$2,905.02
RECENT SPLURGE
NEXT SPLURGE
$1,900 for Baume & Mercier watch, $2,300 for two rings
$10,000 to remodel living room

French fries from a fast-food restaurant

THE UNTROUBLED BACHELOR


FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT

Vince, 27, high-school teacher
Residence: apartment in Rogers Park
Salary: $43,440
Other income: $8,000 for coaching sports and overseeing other extracurricular activities; $1,600 oil-and-gas royalties (from family property)
Total annual income: $53,040
Portfolio: Mutual fund holdings: $25,000;
Savings: $25,000 in a non-interest-bearing checking account

Some people are free of financial angst because they’re filthy rich. Others, such as this teacher at a Northwest Side high school, don’t sweat it because . . . well, we’ll let him explain: “I have enough money squirreled away where I don’t have to work the next two years if I don’t want to,” Vince says, referring to his flush checking account and mutual fund holdings from an inheritance. “So I don’t worry about it.” Boy, doesn’t he worry. “I’m the sort of person who has a bunch of unopened pay stubs lying around the apartment,” he declares. And that 25 grand slowly losing ground to inflation in a checking account? He should “probably” invest it, he allows. On the other hand: “I like to have the fluidity of being able to say, ‘I crashed my car into a tree; I need to go buy a new one.’” More typically Vince’s spending runs in fits and starts. When his teaching and coaching workload is heavy, as was the case here at the peak of exams and basketball season, outlays slow to a trickle—except to fund his fast-food jones. When work eases, he may spend in a rush, loading up at once on books, CDs, sports equipment, and maybe the latest GPS gizmo. As for taking control of his finances, there may be hope. He currently contributes zilch to a retirement plan. No surprise there. But, he says nervously, “I’m hearing about it weekly from my girlfriend.”

MONTHLY EXPENSES

Rent (includes heat)
$800
Electricity
$20
TV and Internet
$110
Cell phone
$60
Auto (fuel and insurance)
$200
Health insurance
$45
Groceries
$120
TOTAL
$1,355
THE WEEK AT A GLANCE
SUNDAY  

Walgreens videotapes, toothpaste, deodorant

$18.36
MONDAY  

Dunkin’ Donuts breakfast

$4.82

China Hut dinner

$10.52
TUESDAY  
School lunch
$4.35
BP Amoco water, candy
$3.47
WEDNESDAY  
Panera lunch
$8.34
Marathon gas
$22.46
Burger King dinner
$7.71
THURSDAY  
School lunch
$4.35
Chipotle dinner
$6.39
FRIDAY  

Starbucks lunch (coffee and sandwich)

$9.75
SATURDAY  

Smoque dinner (ribs and pulled pork) with girlfriend

$36.95
TOTAL SPENDING FOR WEEK
$137.50
RECENT SPLURGE
NEXT SPLURGE
$1,200 for Gateway laptop computer
$1,000 for summer travel to weddings and friends’ houses

illustration of kiwi and hairdryer

THE GLOBETROTTING IMPULSE BUYER


FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT

Jason, 75, interior designer
Residence: apartment in Lake View
Income: $35,000 (includes Social
Security and wages from part-time job)
Portfolio: Annuity: $10,000

Jason, a 75-year-old interior designer, says the three words that best describe him are “lust for life.” Perhaps he should change that first word to wanderlust, given that he speaks four languages and has traveled to more than 100 countries. Next destination: New Zealand. His annual travel tab helps ensure that he “has more [money] going out than coming in” from his Social Security check and part-time job. Does that make him nervous? No way. “I don’t have much sense of money,” he confesses. “I never balance my checkbook. I just don’t worry about it. What good would that do? The good Lord provides.” Then he unfurls a French expression to describe himself. “My whole life is décontracté—unstructured,” he says. “I do everything impulsively, when I feel like it.” That’s certainly true of his spending habits. “I never look at prices—on anything,” he says. “If I like it I buy it—just like Oprah. I’m impulsive.” And what is most likely to trigger an impulse buy? “Anything that sparkles,” he says.

MONTHLY EXPENSES

Rent (includes heat)

$1,700
Electricity
$60
Water
$35
Cable TV
$100
Telephone (includes $15 AT&T long distance)
$50
Groceries
$500
BlueCross BlueShield
$169
Medicare (includes subscription drug plan)
$35
Bottled water service
$40
Pet care (food, grooming, treats for dog)
$85
TOTAL
$2,774
THE WEEK AT A GLANCE
SUNDAY  

No expenses; at home all day

 
MONDAY  

CTA roundtrip fare (senior discount) $2.00

$2.00

CVS toothbrush

$3.50
TUESDAY  
Salon in Lake View hair trim (including tip)
$40.00
Trader Joe’s condiments and tea
$25.00
Save-Rite prescription medication
$32.00
WEDNESDAY  
CTA roundtrip bus fare (senior discount)
$2.00
Petsmart dog food
$35.00
Quiznos lunch
$4.50
THURSDAY  
AT&T phone bill
$32.14
Lake View dry cleaner tailoring of trousers
$20.00
FRIDAY  

CTA roundtrip bus fare (senior discount)

$2.00
SATURDAY  
Ulta hair products
$15.00
CTA roundtrip bus fare (senior discount)
$2.00
TOTAL SPENDING FOR WEEK
$215.14
RECENT SPLURGE
NEXT SPLURGE
$5,000 in 2006 for travel to Abu Dhabi, Dubai, and Oman
$6,000 for trip to New Zealand in the spring

Introduction

Who Makes What - Salaries List

Who Makes What - Profiles

Who Makes What - Comparisons


Who Will Do Better?

The $18-Million Headache

Where Does It All Go?

The Bucks Start Here

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