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Langham’s Chuan Spa Is Nice—But the Club Lounge Is Outstanding

This week: A Labor Day getaway, behind-the-scenes look at the world’s busiest airport, and glamping around the world.

A butler at Langham Chicago
Photo: Courtesy of Nina Kokotas Hahn

Old-world charm: Seven butlers are at your service

When Langham Chicago (330 N. Wabash Ave., 312-923-9988; from $395) opened in July, we lamented its lagging Travelle Restaurant and Chuan Spa, which were not ready for the hotel’s soft opening. Both have since opened: Travelle just over two weeks ago and, last Monday, the sprawling Chuan Spa.

But what really has us singing Langham’s praises is the new Club Lounge, which opened last Wednesday. Essentially a private common area for guests who book a suite-level room, Langham’s lounge stands apart from similar offerings at other hotels on at least two fronts: butler service and outstanding views up and down the Chicago River. (Right now, Langham is offering a $65 per person introductory rate for the Club Lounge for regular room guests; the price will go up to $75 in January and to $100 on April 1.)

Butler service? A team of seven butlers, actually, all trained at North America’s only accredited butler academy (run by Charles MacPherson, author of The Butler Speaks). “We call our guests before they arrive to introduce ourselves and anticipate their needs,” says Carlos Carrera, director of butler services. When guests arrive, they check in privately at the Club Lounge. Says Carrera, “We can pack and unpack their bags, press up to three garments, draw a bath from a bath menu—really, we are ready to help with any request.”

Located on Langham’s 13th floor (technically 12C), the giant L-shaped space hugs the south side of the building with floor-to-ceiling windows and, capitalizing on Langham’s location, feels as though it is hovering over the Chicago River. Inside, the modern and spacious lounge includes a bright buffet area and dining space, a lounge area that surrounds a travertine-enclosed fireplace, and a cozy library space with Eames loungers. Guests may nibble on free food all day, including breakfast, light snacks, afternoon tea, and evening cocktails and charcuterie.
 

Experience Old-Fashioned Labor at Old World Wisconsin

Rather than mourn the end of summer, look to fall and head to Old World Wisconsin this Labor Day weekend, where the region’s 19th-century farmsteads will be kicking off autumn harvest activities, such as farmers filling larders and gathering crops. “Autumn on the Farms” starts Thursday, September 5, and runs through Sunday, October 13; Thursdays through Sundays only.
 

Here’s a Guide to “Glamping” Around the World

From Ecocamp in Torres del Paine National Park, Chile, to Zarafa Camp in Botswana’s Selinda Game Reserve, Condé Nast Traveler rounds up glamping retreats “around the globe that combine creature comforts with critter access.” For Chicago magazine’s glamping pick, see Paws Up in “Five Summer Trips for Adventure Seekers.”
 

A Look Behind the Scenes at One of the World’s Busiest Airports (That is Not O’Hare)

Last week, more than 30 journalists from CNN went to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport to find out what really goes on at the world’s busiest airport (by volume of passengers). “CNN is looking at the areas we never see when we travel—behind-the-scenes luggage screening with the Transportation Security Administration, on the ramp with Southwest Airlines ground crews and more.” See the first photos or follow the ongoing feed on Twitter and Instagram at #ATL24.
 

What to Do in Paris on a Sunday?

“In Europe, Sundays are apparently a day of rest (not sure who made that up, but it sounds unwholesome, if you ask me),” writes Geraldine DeRuiter of The Everywhereist. Paris is no exception—until DeRuiter uncovers a few busy gems, including Les Marais (the Jewish Quarter) and the Musée du Luxembourg. Read more at The Everywhereist.
 

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