Three Chicago Menswear Lines

SHOPPER: Sir & Madame, Nonnie, and Chivalry Is Not Dead

A shirt, tie, and backpack from Nonnie

There’s an expanding class of homegrown men’s clothing and accessories lines in Chicago, and many of the designers are looking back to 20th-century Americana as inspiration.

“I try to do a little something extra on each piece, but not too much—men don’t like a lot of detail,” says Jonnie Rettele, the designer behind Nonnie, which got its start three years ago with a run of heritage-style shirting. With this season’s collection, Rettele introduces shirts in herringbone twills and Japanese-milled cottons, including the side panel shirt ($180) at left, as well as quilted vests, waxed cotton jackets, and tab-collared coats—all of which are reminiscent of 1960s and 1970s work clothes.

Brian and Autumn Merritt are the husband-and-wife team that produces Sir & Madame, a line of tailored separates (with styles for women) that features updates on Anglo-American sportswear staples—such as oxfords, riding pants, and letterman jackets—and accessories, including the rucksack ($300) at left. The Merritts sell their subtly jaunty designs in the Ukrainian Village boutique—also called Sir & Madame (938 N. Damen Ave.; 773-489-6660)—they opened in 2010.

A tag declaring “Chivalry Is Not Dead” is sewn on the back of each of the ties ($80, left) designed by Shannon Eaton. Eaton, a DJ for the @Superfun crew (Virgil Abloh, above, is also a member), started the Chivalry Is Not Dead label late last year after getting compliments on old-school collegiate-prep ties he had made for himself. “It’s definitely rooted in Ivy League tradition,” says Eaton, who chose ginghams, colored cham­brays, and silks printed with crowns, crests, and other gentlemanly patterns for this fall’s batch.

SHOP Nonnie, at nonniethreads.com; Sir & Madame, at sirandmadame.com; Chivalry Is Not Dead, at freshandproper.com

Finds Men’s clothing and accessories designed in Chicago

 

Photography: Courtesy of vendors

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