Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit Module

Addressing the Realpolitik: Facts Are Still Stubborn Things

The facts, reports Rex Huppke, are dead: “survived by two brothers, Rumor and Innuendo, and a sister, Emphatic Assertion.” We have a sense of who killed them, but what’s the motive?

facts

 

I think Rex Huppke’s obituary for facts has shown up in my Twitter feed 50 times today (given the news, I’m not going to check). If you haven’t read it via Jim Romenesko, or Jay Rosen, or NPR’s Math Guy, or so forth, here’s a taste:

Through the 19th and 20th centuries, Facts reached adulthood as the world underwent a shift toward proving things true through the principles of physics and mathematical modeling. There was respect for scientists as arbiters of the truth, and Facts itself reached the peak of its power.

[snip]

People unable to understand how science works began to question Facts. And at the same time there was a rise in political partisanship and a growth in the number of media outlets that would disseminate information, rarely relying on feedback from Facts.

It’s about the most viral thing I’ve seen come out of the Tribune in quite some while. So if you liked the obit, I highly recommend the best-selling biography (emphasis mine):

The paranoid style is not confined to our own country and time; it is an international phenomenon. Studying the millennial sects of Europe from the eleventh to the sixteenth century, Norman Cohn believed he found a persistent psychic complex that corresponds broadly with what I have been considering—a style made up of certain preoccupations and fantasies: “the megalomaniac view of oneself as the Elect, wholly good, abominably persecuted, yet assured of ultimate triumph; the attribution of gigantic and demonic powers to the adversary; the refusal to accept the ineluctable limitations and imperfections of human existence, such as transience, dissention, conflict, fallibility whether intellectual or moral; the obsession with inerrable prophecies…systematized misinterpretations, always gross and often grotesque.”

This glimpse across a long span of time emboldens me to make the conjecture—it is no more than that—that a mentality disposed to see the world in this way may be a persistent psychic phenomenon, more or less constantly affecting a modest minority of the population…. In American experience ethnic and religious conflict have plainly been a major focus for militant and suspicious minds of this sort, but class conflicts also can mobilize such energies…. The situation becomes worse when the representatives of a particular social interest—perhaps because of the very unrealistic and unrealizable nature of its demands—are shut out of the political process. Having no access to political bargaining or the making of decisions, they find their original conception that the world of power is sinister and malicious fully confirmed. They see only the consequences of power—and this through distorting lenses—and have no chance to observe its actual machinery.

—Richard Hofstadter, “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” Harper’s Magazine, November 1964. Also recommended: the extended dance remix.

Share

Edit Module

Advertisement

Edit Module
Submit your comment

Comments are moderated. We review them in an effort to remove foul language, commercial messages, abuse, and irrelevancies.

Edit Module