Jeanne Gang Talks Architecture at Stop Smiling

The local starchtect discusses “Reveal,” the new monograph about Studio Gang, as the Gang-designed Ford Calumet Environmental Center hangs in the balance. Alternately, Lisa Madigan appears on the Interview Show tonight at the Hideout.

Tonight at 7 at the Stop Smiling storefront (1371 N. Milwaukee), Jeanne Gang talks about Reveal, the new Studio Gang monograph. Studio Gang’s now on Twitter, by the way. Lynn Becker is a fan of the book; Dwell has a preview.

It’ll be interesting to see if the subject of the Ford Calumet Environmental Center comes up. David Roeder and Lynn Becker report that the long-planned research and learning center about the Calumet area is on the rocks. Gang won the competition to design it back in 2004, and nine million dollars has come in between Ford and the state, but it’s still up in the air. Becker is in particular furious:

And of course, the city line is that it’s all Studio/Gang’s fault, just like Richard M. Daley tried to pin the cost overruns at Millennium Park on Frank Gehry during one of his infamous, petulant press conferences.  What’s the truth?  We’ll probably never know.

What I do know, however, is that Studio/Gang has made its reputation by creating amazing architecture on very tight budgets in projects such as the SOS Community Center, at the Chinese American Service League.

It’s yet another plan to keep an eye on in the transition between Daley and Rahm Emanuel.

Update: Gang responds to the numbers.

Speaking of Jeanne Gang:

* As part of our 40 Reasons to Love Chicago, Geoffrey Johnson explained how Gang’s masterpiece, Aqua, works.

* In 2006, Lynn Becker placed Gang in what he calls the third school of Chicago architecture, along with Douglas Garofalo, John Ronan, and others.

* Here’s a tour of the Columbia College Chicago Media Production Center (via Talkitecht):

 

And if you can’t make it tonight, here’s Gang on the Interview Show with Mark Bazer (who’s hosting Lisa Madigan and Wendy McClure tonight at the Hideout):

 

 

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