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What Happened in Chicago Culture This Week?

Next Theatre Company is closed, Uptown becomes Gotham City, and reviews for Lindsay Hunter’s Ugly Girls are in.

Jonathan Eig’s new book, The Birth of the Pill, is reviewed in The New Yorker this week.   Photo: Nuccio Dinuzzo

Exit Stage Left

The Tribune’s Chris Jones dissects the sudden dissolution of the Evanston staple Next Theatre Company.  

RIP Rashad

The Reader’s Leor Galil talks about late footwork pioneer DJ Rashad’s legacy with Rashad’s friends and collaborators.

Gotham v. Chi-Town

The crew of Batman v. Superman transform Uptown into Gotham City. 

Choppy Waters

Friends of the Park, a local nonprofit parks advocacy group, file suit to stop the Lucas Museum, claiming the museum violates the Lakefront Protection Ordinance, which ensures that the lakefront is kept building-free. 

Conception of the Pill

The New Yorker reviews Chicago native Jonathan Eig’s new, thoroughly-reported book The Birth of the Pill: How Four Crusaders Reinvented Sex and Launched a Revolution. 

Review Revue

Chicago profiled author Lindsay Hunter back in October. Her debut novel, Ugly Girls, is out now:

The Guardian: “Even if we don’t like these bad girls, Hunter has written them in such a way that we understand them. We feel for Perry and Baby Girl. And we feel an overwhelming sense of relief that we are not in the car alongside them.”

Time Out New York: “…Hunter constructs a magnificently well-wrought and honest portrait of how assumptions and stereotypes can erode any spirit down to worthlessness.”

Huffington Post: “Hunter’s first novel exposes the ugly truths about human desire while showing off her skill at crafting poignant scenes.”

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