Ten Stories Every Chicagoan Should Read

Learn Beverly’s unusual story of integration, get to know the city’s young dining hotshots, meet the sexiest dog in Chicago, and more.

Theo Epstein   Photo: Phil Velasquez/Chicago Tribune

1. We Are Chicago

Why an indie video game developer made a game about South Side gang violence. Polygon tells the story.

2. Apples, Oranges, Bambinos, and Billy Goats

Why hasn’t Theo Epstein fixed the Cubs as quickly as he did the Red Sox? Grantland has the answers.

3. A Project to Improve Poor Children’s Education Also Helped Their Health

A study led by the U. of C.’s James Heckman suggests that “poverty is not a hopeless condition.” The New York Times explains.

4. In Chicago’s Beverly Neighborhood, Integration Is No Accident

How a forward-thinking planning association minimized white flight from the South Side neighborhood. WBEZ unearths its history.

5. Why Do Affluent, Well-Educated People Refuse Vaccines?

They have a lot of resources, and the willingness to question their doctors. Chicago reviews the literature.

6. Will Robert DeNiro Ruin Chicago’s Meatpacking District?

The Near West Side, anchored by some of the city’s best restaurants, is booming—and drawing immense interest from big names. Crain’s investigates.

7. 30 Under 30: Chicago’s Hottest Up-and-Comers

From beer directors to executive chefs, meet the next generation of Chicago’s food scene. Zagat picks the top talent.

8. Paradiso Blekitna Przystan Is the Sexiest Dog in Chicago

He’s 110 pounds, takes commands in English and Polish, and hates to miss a dog show. The Reader profiles a champion.

9. Finding Support for the Military’s Male Victims of Rape

A VA center is reaching out to victims of assault, many of whom have remained silent for decades. The Tribune reports.

10. The Power of Malört

Chicago’s famously terrible liqueur is popular—and after more than a century, it’s now trademarked. Chicago ranks the original and its imitators.

 

Share

Advertisement

Submit your comment

Comments are moderated. We review them in an effort to remove foul language, commercial messages, abuse, and irrelevancies.

Note: To serve its readers better, Chicago has migrated its comments to Disqus, a popular commenting platform. Please feel free to contact us with any feedback.