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10 Stories to Read This Week

How a community takes back its block, 31 love letters to Chicago, and a look at CHA’s great upheaval.

Chicago Cubs president Theo Epstein   Photo: Brian Cassella/Chicago Tribune

1. The CHA’s Great Upheaval

When the CHA pulled down its high-rises, where did tenants go? First of all, to South Shore, “the new subsidized-housing capital of Chicago.” The Sun-Times and the BGA issue a special report.

2. Chicago Does Little to Control Police Misconduct—Or Its Costs

The big settlements get the headlines, but half average just $36k. And it adds up. Yet the city isn’t asking why. The Chicago Reporter analyzes the numbers.

3. How Union Contracts Shield Police Departments from DOJ Reforms

And it’s not just in Chicago. From Pittsburgh to the U.S. Virgin Islands to Los Angeles, police unions have the leverage to fight back. In These Times looks at decades of attempted reforms.

4. Inside the Brilliant, Bizarre World of Jesse Ball

He’s an experimental novelist who thinks books should be practical. Judging by the response of readers, critics, and students, he’s figured out how to do it. Joe Meno profiles the author for Chicago magazine.

5. Reasons to Love Chicago

The Grid, the cheap seats at the Cell, the alleys, the accent, and more. The Reader counts the ways for its Best of Chicago issue.

6. Austin Semipro Football Team Gives Men Chance to Help Selves, Community

One running back has lost 20 acquaintances to the West Side’s violence. He was recruited off a street corner. The team is a way to change. The Tribune visits the Austin-based Chicago Sabers.

7. Everybody Wants Their Own Theo Epstein

He came up in the game from a place of privilege, and can bridge the gap between jocks, statheads, and the businessmen who write the checks. The Ringer looks for the secret of his success.

8. Fight or Flight: Taking Back Chicago’s Violent Blocks

What do you do when your nine-year-old is too afraid to leave the house? WBEZ asks residents.

9. Chicago and Jazz at Play, Ideally

Is the city having another big moment in its long history with the genre? The New York Times thinks so.

10. How Financial Crises Set the Table for Brexit (and Trump)

A University of Chicago economist finds that polarization is the predictable result of severe economic downturns across the world. Chicago magazine explains.

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