On a recent visit to Stitch, I was drawn to what I thought was textile art hanging on the wall. In a way, it was. These linen “tea towels” ($48 each) feature limited-edition drawings that artists from around the world submitted to an Australian collective called Third Drawer Down. This organization aims to give lesser-known artists widespread exposure while offering consumers an affordable way to own original art. Sure, the towels can be used to dry dishes, but I love the idea of framing them and hanging them up.

—Gina Bazer

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Dish Towels or Art?


On a recent visit to Stitch, I was drawn to what I thought was textile art hanging on the wall. In a way, it was. These linen “tea towels” ($48 each) feature limited-edition drawings that artists from around the world submitted to an Australian collective called Third Drawer Down. This organization aims to give lesser-known artists widespread exposure while offering consumers an affordable way to own original art. Sure, the towels can be used to dry dishes, but I love the idea of framing them and hanging them up.


On a recent visit to Stitch, I was drawn to what I thought was textile art hanging on the wall. In a way, it was. These linen “tea towels” ($48 each) feature limited-edition drawings that artists from around the world submitted to an Australian collective called Third Drawer Down. This organization aims to give lesser-known artists widespread exposure while offering consumers an affordable way to own original art. Sure, the towels can be used to dry dishes, but I love the idea of framing them and hanging them up.

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