Holly Hunt, center, with interior designers Laura Kirar and Doug Levine (her former staffers, featured in our May/June issue)

It was the biggest design party of the year. That’s a risky statement as I am not the biggest partier at the office, but I’m going to throw it out there ’cause I haven’t been to a party like this in a long time (I blame a certain three-year-old who lives in my house for this). Holly Hunt’s 25th anniversary bash Monday night on the terrace of the Harris Theater was HUGE. Some 1,200 beautifully dressed people showed up to fete the design doyenne, who seemed genuinely touched by the show of support as she addressed the crowd from the stage before introducing the evening’s entertainment, Poi Dog Pondering. Hunt is beloved by the design industry and this showed—as did her long-held business mantra of offering the “best in class.” The food and wine were abundant and delightful, and the setting was classic and perfectly appropriate. Guests looked like movie extras lounging on the Holly Hunt Great Outdoors casual furniture line, displayed in surprisingly un-muted tones, below a gigantic billowing white tent that was illuminated by modern orange-shaded fixtures. Even the day’s iffy weather cleared up just in time. Here’s to another 25!

—Gina Bazer


Photos by Chris Guillen Photography

">

Holly Hunt’s Big Bash


Holly Hunt, center, with interior designers Laura Kirar and Doug Levine (her former staffers, featured in our May/June issue)

It was the biggest design party of the year. That’s a risky statement as I am not the biggest partier at the office, but I’m going to throw it out there ’cause I haven’t been to a party like this in a long time (I blame a certain three-year-old who lives in my house for this). Holly Hunt’s 25th anniversary bash Monday night on the terrace of the Harris Theater was HUGE. Some 1,200 beautifully dressed people showed up to fete the design doyenne, who seemed genuinely touched by the show of support as she addressed the crowd from the stage before introducing the evening’s entertainment, Poi Dog Pondering. Hunt is beloved by the design industry and this showed—as did her long-held business mantra of offering the “best in class.” The food and wine were abundant and delightful, and the setting was classic and perfectly appropriate. Guests looked like movie extras lounging on the Holly Hunt Great Outdoors casual furniture line, displayed in surprisingly un-muted tones, below a gigantic billowing white tent that was illuminated by modern orange-shaded fixtures. Even the day’s iffy weather cleared up just in time. Here’s to another 25!

Photos by Chris Guillen Photography


Holly Hunt, center, with interior designers Laura Kirar and Doug Levine (her former staffers, featured in our May/June issue)

It was the biggest design party of the year. That’s a risky statement as I am not the biggest partier at the office, but I’m going to throw it out there ’cause I haven’t been to a party like this in a long time (I blame a certain three-year-old who lives in my house for this). Holly Hunt’s 25th anniversary bash Monday night on the terrace of the Harris Theater was HUGE. Some 1,200 beautifully dressed people showed up to fete the design doyenne, who seemed genuinely touched by the show of support as she addressed the crowd from the stage before introducing the evening’s entertainment, Poi Dog Pondering. Hunt is beloved by the design industry and this showed—as did her long-held business mantra of offering the “best in class.” The food and wine were abundant and delightful, and the setting was classic and perfectly appropriate. Guests looked like movie extras lounging on the Holly Hunt Great Outdoors casual furniture line, displayed in surprisingly un-muted tones, below a gigantic billowing white tent that was illuminated by modern orange-shaded fixtures. Even the day’s iffy weather cleared up just in time. Here’s to another 25!

Photos by Chris Guillen Photography

Share

Advertisement

Submit your comment

Comments are moderated. We review them in an effort to remove foul language, commercial messages, abuse, and irrelevancies.

Note: To serve its readers better, Chicago has migrated its comments to Disqus, a popular commenting platform. Please feel free to contact us with any feedback.