What’s New on Chicago’s Design Scene

Find new things at I.D. and White Attic, plus gardening classes at Sprout Home.

Michele Quan's bells and I.D.'s Turn collection, both new at Lake View's I.D.   Photographs courtesy of mquan.com and bludot.com

New Collections at I.D.

You can always count on the North Side boutique I.D. for a hit of hip design. The latest arrivals? Brooklyn-based ceramicist Michele Quan (not to be confused with the retired figure skater Michelle Kwan), whose porcelain skulls were big sellers at the shop, is now introducing her large porcelain and hemp bells (read more about them in this lovely post on Ashes & Milk). Also new for spring, Blu Dot’s Turn collection, which includes accent tables and stools. This warm, modern line has some heft to it (the pieces are all made of solid acacia wood), yet the pieces are very well priced. The coffee table is $649, the side table (bottom right) is $349, and the stool (top right) is $299.

Get Schooled at Sprout Home

Spring is not quite in the air yet, but the optimistic folks at Sprout Home are still hosting a class on seed starting, this Sunday from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Learn about the right soil, containers, and steps required to successfully germinate flowers and edibles. Later in the month, there’s a class called “The Early Garden.” According to Sprout’s website, “your garden can boast flowers even with a little snow on the ground.” Hmm. Check out the full schedule on the website.

White Attic’s Signature Line

Andersonville’s White Attic, known for turning thrift shop nuggets into charming new pieces, recently started building its own original designs, most with elements inspired by beloved vintage one-offs that were carted off by lucky customers. By popular demand, a nightstand is the latest design. Made with locally sourced materials, this sweet-‘n’-mod little cabinet is currently available in light jade, black and white for $395. Want something else? Put in your request—it might appear at the shop one day.

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