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Forever Young

This past spring, for the International Antiques Fair at the Merchandise Mart, we asked three interior designers—Greg Jagmin, Julia Buckingham Edelmann, and Hillery Estes—to create vignettes for us that use antiques in a fresh way. What did we learn? That antiques are not stodgy if given a chance to be hip. Take inspiration from these timeless rooms when you’re shopping this fall’s fair.

INTERNATIONAL ANTIQUES FAIR
October 2-5, $15
merchandisemartantiques.com

 

Estes turned notions of old and new upside down by finding clean-lined antiques (such as the 1940s French industrial steel end table), and pairing them with an edgy update on a classic—a Louis XV–style chair in unfinished wood, with red patent-leather upholstery, new from William Switzer.

1  Hillery Estes
312-320-0414
estesinteriors.net

Estes turned notions of old and new upside down by finding clean-lined antiques (such as the 1940s French industrial steel end table), and pairing them with an edgy update on a classic—a Louis XV–style chair in unfinished wood, with red patent-leather upholstery, new from William Switzer.

 

Jagmin put together a sophisticated yet fun entryway, combining the youthful pop of David Hicks’s Hexagon wallpaper and a mid-century Saarinen table with traditional Louis XV–style chairs and 18th-century Italian faux-marble cabinets. To be playful, he put different-colored Buddhas (standing for peace, hope, and prosperity) on the shelves—a welcoming touch.

2  Greg Jagmin
312-316-0968

Jagmin put together a sophisticated yet fun entryway, combining the youthful pop of David Hicks’s Hexagon wallpaper and a mid-century Saarinen table with traditional Louis XV–style chairs and 18th-century Italian faux-marble cabinets. To be playful, he put different-colored Buddhas (standing for peace, hope, and prosperity) on the shelves—a welcoming touch.

 

Edelmann used an 18th-century English mantel to create instant intimacy for her library/lounge and a contemporary rug from Atelier Lapchi to establish a vibrant, unpredictable point of view. The orange hand-stitched paper wallcovering by Maya Romanoff “created a happiness and made people want to come in,” she says.

3  Julia Edelmann
312-933-8359
buckinghamid.com

Edelmann used an 18th-century English mantel to create instant intimacy for her library/lounge and a contemporary rug from Atelier Lapchi to establish a vibrant, unpredictable point of view. The orange hand-stitched paper wallcovering by Maya Romanoff “created a happiness and made people want to come in,” she says.

For resources, see Buy Guide

 

Photography: Eric Hausman

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