Room-to-Room Paint Schemes

Glenview homeowner Amy Schneider was raised in a house decorated in neutrals. “I vowed that when I grew up, I’d have a different color in every room,” she says…

(page 3 of 4)

You love: SOFT COLORS

A home office decorated in soft colors
This office, designed by Gregga Jordan Smiezny, is filled with shades of celery green, nicely complementing the woods in the room.

 

James White paint by Farrow & Ball
ENTRYWAY
Alex Jordan would put James White on the walls, ceiling, and trim in the entryway and continue it on ceilings and trim throughout the house. Entryway floor tiles would be slate gray, echoed elsewhere in the house by dark gray doors.

 

Light Blue paint by Farrow & Ball
LIVING ROOM
Jordan imagines pairing Light Blue walls with furniture upholstered in ivory linen and leather, dark brown and green accents, and some wood pieces.

 

Old White paint by Farrow & Ball
DINING ROOM
“The dining room would be a more monochromatic space, where flowers, candles, and food take center stage.” Jordan imagines polished mahogany furniture with distressed gray leather upholstery on the chairs in this light gray space.

 

Cooking Apple Green paint by Farrow & Ball
MASTER BEDROOM
Painted white furniture and fabrics in greens and whites (“they can be in a toile or a gingham, something with a Swedish feel”) would play off the apple-green walls and make for a cheerful, inviting space.

 

WHY IT WORKS
Designer Alex Jordan of Gregga Jordan Smieszny (gjsinc.com) pictures a Scandinavian style in this imaginary house, with natural oak or chestnut floors that have a “raw, dry look to them” playing off the soft palette of ivory, gray-blue, light gray, and sage on the walls. To counter the softness, he would paint all the doors in the same dark gray, Farrow & Ball’s Down Pipe (26). All the moldings, baseboards, and door casings in the house would be the same ivory color as the entryway. With certain elements recurring from space to space (ivory trim, dark gray doors, and other versions of gray, such as the slate tile in the entry and in the leather upholstery in the dining room chairs), the “rooms weave back upon themselves.”

 

Photograph: Bruce Van Inwegen

Share

Advertisement

Submit your comment

Comments are moderated. We review them in an effort to remove foul language, commercial messages, abuse, and irrelevancies.

Note: To serve its readers better, Chicago has migrated its comments to Disqus, a popular commenting platform. Please feel free to contact us with any feedback.