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Will Shoppers Rush Michigan Avenue on Topshop’s Opening Day?

SHOPPER: The British retailer brings its second U.S. store to Chicago on September 7

Wide-leg devorée satin pants and Windy City nail polish from Topshop

When the Britain-based clothing retailer Topshop inaugurated its first U.S. flagship in 2009, The New York Times used the term “mosh pit” to describe the SoHo store’s opening day. Will shoppers rush Michigan Avenue on September 7, when the company opens its second stateside location in the corner space that, until recently, housed Borders? Hard to say (though Topshop is betting 35,000 square feet of floor space that Chicago, like New York, will be receptive).

The two cities will share similar inventory for women and men (clothes for guys appear under the Topman label), as well as Topshop’s signature line of makeup. But the king of fast fashion (each year, the brand churns out around 15,000 trend-driven looks, ranging from $30 to $600) seems to have picked up on the Second City’s self-awareness when it comes to style. This fall’s Unique collection—a twice-yearly run of higher-end, concept-driven designs—will feature pieces that take cues from 1930s-era Chicago. The sleek yet hard-edged items will be exclusive to the Michigan Avenue store, including wide-leg devorée satin pants ($180, left) with the city’s name etched in a Deco-inspired pattern.

“I suppose it was a bit tongue-in-cheek,” says Sir Philip Green, Topshop’s charismatic billionaire owner—which could make a person wonder about the color chosen for Windy City: a nail polish ($10, left) created for the Chicago opening that comes in an overcast shade between blue and gray.

GO 830 N. Michigan Ave.; us.topshop.com

Finds Runway-inspired and signature clothing and shoes for women and men; makeup in youthful colors

 

Photography: Courtesy of vendors

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