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Here Are the 10 Stories You Should Read This Week

Remaking Goose Island, why the Cubs’ great record isn’t a fluke, and the complicated life of Pierre Loury.

The Chicago Cubs celebrate a walk-off win on Mother’s Day.   Photo: Nancy Stone/Chicago Tribune

1. Police Data Cast Doubt on Chicago-Style Stop and Frisk

As contact cards documenting stops increased, firearm recovery and murder clearance went down. WBEZ runs the numbers.

2. Boy, 16, Shot by Police, Lived and Died in One of City’s Toughest Neighborhoods

Pierre Loury’s family opens up about the complexities of living in East Garfield Park. The Tribune finds his story.

3. An Inside Look at Private Investigation

What does a PI do? There’s only one way to find out: follow them. Chicago magazine goes on a ride-along.

4. Interview: Amanda Williams

The Chicago Biennial star (and Auburn-Gresham native) talks about how her art and architecture meet in her “Color(ed) Theory” series of painted buildings. Bad at Sports talks to an artist on the rise.

5. The Cubs Look Like a Perfect Baseball Team

They’ve got an amazing record, and it doesn’t look like luck. Fangraphs analyzes their success.

6. In Deeply Divided Chicago, Most Agree: City Is Off Course

A new poll shows that residents are unhappy with the mayor and the city’s institutions, but there are still stark geographic divides amidst the consensus. The New York Times and the Kaiser Family Foundation collaborate.

7. Chicago’s Young Black Activists Don’t Care If They Offend You

And behind the rhetoric is a movement learning from the structural mistakes of its predecessors. DNAInfo goes inside.

8. Remaking Goose Island, One of Chicago’s Great Industrial Hubs

A developer working in the area describes its future. Curbed Chicago talks to Matt Garrison of R2 Companies.

9. Tammy Duckworth vs. Mark Kirk: Who Will Win?

Two well-known pols are competing in what could be “the most contentious—and important—Senate race in the country.” Chicago magazine breaks it down.

10. As Hospitals Reduce Stays, Nearby Hotels Find a Growing Business

Major surgeries are becoming outpatient procedures, meaning a captive audience for out-of-town patients. Crain’s explains the boom.

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